How to use JAZZ CHANTS in class

English with music and mind maps
Преподаватель английского по Скайпу

Computer version of jazz chants:   

http://www.languages-with-music.com/eivwm.html

SERIES OF COMPUTER PROGRAMS BASED ON JAZZ CHANTS IDEAS

EASY TO USE IN CLASS AND DESIGNED FOR CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES

  • You can set the necessary number of repetitions of either all the words and phrases in an exercise or only the chosen ones.
  • An easy to follow pronunciation.
  • Different dynamic background effects.
  • Playlist.
  • Instead of a slider the program has tabs to easily find and repeat playing a word or phrase.
  • A user-friendly presentation of our programs in your computer with the help of the innovative viewer.
  • No distortion on screens of any sizes.
  • Signals to start speaking at the proper moment.
Click on the picture to download:



Skills:  rhythm and intonation in spoken English, grammar review and idioms
Materials:  written copies of the jazz chant, pictures of words and phrases if necessary

How to Play:

Jazz chants can be used at any level of literacy by adjusting the length and complexity of the chant itself.  If you want your tutee to learn a longer chant, consider breaking it up into pieces while he or she is learning it.

1. Choose a chant.  The chant should pertain to what ever topic you are discussing in your lessons.  For example, if you are working on job interviewing skills with your tutee, you might choose a chant like “I work hard.”  Likewise, if your goal is to teach complex sentence structures, you might choose the chant, “I went to the store.” (Full sample chants are shown below.)
2. Teach the chant orally.  Model the chant several times, acting it out if possible, for your tutee.  Then, teach the chant orally before passing out written copies of the text.  Make sure to explain any new vocabulary to your tutee.  Have your tutee repeat the lines after you several times, first.  Next, have your tutee practice saying the first line while you reply with the second, and then switch.  Go through the entire chant this way.  Make sure to point out rhythms and stress patterns as you go.  When your tutee seems comfortable with the text, move to the next step.
3. Read the chant.  Give your tutee a written copy of the chant and practice the chant as you did in Step 2.  This time, though, ask your tutee to follow the words on the page as he or she chants.  Have your tutee point to the words he or she is saying while chanting so that you know that he or she is in the right place.
4. Writing: Fill in the Blank.  Write parts of the chant on the board, leaving one word out.  For example, “Thank you for __________ with me.”  Ask your tutee to write in the missing word.  Encourage him or her to refer back to the written chant if necessary.  

Variation:

Use pictures for key words and phrases if it helps your tutee understand the sentence.

Using chants that are very short and that rhyme are very good for developing rhythm, intonation, and phonemic awareness in low-level learners.  For example:
I like spring time.
I like fall.
I like the seasons.
I like them all.

Make sure that your tutee practices saying all parts of the chant.

* “Jazz Chants” is borrowed from Jazz Chants, by Carolyn Graham (1978).

Chant: “I work hard.”   Chant: “I went to the store.”
I work hard. I went to the store.
How do you work? Where did you go?
I work hard. I went to the store.
How do you work? Where did you go?
I work hard. I went to the store.
How do you work? Where did you go?
I have experience. I bought a cake.
Where do you work? What did you buy?
I have experience. I bought a cake.
Where do you work? What did you buy?
I have experience. I bought a cake.
Where do you work? What did you buy?
I work at Harvard. I went to the store, AND I bought a cake.
Oh, very nice! What did you do?
I work at Harvard. I went to the store, AND I bought a cake.
Oh, very nice! What did you do?
I work at Harvard. I went to the store, AND I bought a cake.
Oh, very nice! What did you do?


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